Latest Tweets:

cabinporn:

Towering treehouse in the hills north of Santa Cruz, CA.

Submitted & photographed by John Watson.

More at The Radavist.

(via treeporn)

wwwtxt:

CyberSpace will hopefully not become just another power-oriented frontier fraught with struggle and violence. ☯92MAR

wnderlst:

Anarstarpi, Iceland | Jens Klettenheimer

wnderlst:

Anarstarpi, Iceland | Jens Klettenheimer

*4

thisisjustgreat:

✨🌟✨ 💩 ✨🌟✨

lextempus:

Best thing about Colbert is that when he nails it, he nails it.

(via sickappledesigns)

*7

do not erase

Anonymous asked: what do you want do with your life?

thisisjustgreat:

A lot, hopefully.

(Source: ms-dos5, via windowshighasfuck)

(Source: elfin-glamour, via jennhasablog)

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding

Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

toofrenchtofunction:

deputychairman:

TAKE YOUR OBJECTIFYING MALE GAZE AWAY FROM CATE BLANCHETT

GALADRIEL IS HAVING NONE OF YOUR BULLSHIT

toofrenchtofunction:

deputychairman:

TAKE YOUR OBJECTIFYING MALE GAZE AWAY FROM CATE BLANCHETT

GALADRIEL IS HAVING NONE OF YOUR BULLSHIT

(Source: mattsgifs)

"Artists hold a unique place in society in that they are held in high esteem because they are distributors of comfort and joy and relief. The job is really essential, but the role of a musician is changing. It isn’t the glamor draw that it used to be, and if you want to make audacious work, you are risking not being able to pay your rent, and that’s OK. But there are people who don’t have to worry about paying their rent who still make music that sounds like they’re trying to pay the rent rather than taking on the possibilities of what they could achieve. In reality, it’s become a similar life choice to be in the arts and to make music as it is to be a politician or banker at this point."

Wild Beasts’ Hayden Thorpe (via pitchfork)

(via thisisjustgreat)

blue-voids:

Soekmin Ko - The Square, 2010-11

*20

wnderlst:

Water drops on dandelion seedsSharon Johnstone